d.light S10
Solar lantern

Energy and Environment

The d.light S10 is an affordable, high-quality solar LED (light-emitting diode) lamp, offering a bright and durable replacement for kerosene lanterns. It can be used to light a room, for studying or working, or as a portable flashlight. With an integrated solar panel and multiple-setting handle, the d.light S10 is very convenient to use.

4.47059
5 Reviews
Detailed Description: 

The d.light S10 is the world’s most affordable high-quality solar LED lantern, and is a bright and durable replacement for kerosene lanterns.  It provides even space lighting for the home, workplace, or on the go. It can function as a general light source or serve as a primary task light. With an integrated solar panel and multiple-setting handle, the d.light S10 is extremely flexible and convenient to use.

Price Comments: 
This product has been superseded by a newer model
Warranty & Return Policy: 

Warranty, Return and Refund policies depend on the country where the equipment will be delivered, and on the degree of coordination we will be able to set up with local organizations/distributors.

Additional Information: 

d.light was the winner of the Zayed Future Energy Prize 2013, the world’s largest annual award in the renewable and sustainable energy sector. d.light was selected in the small and medium size enterprise category.

Technical Overview: 
  • Two brightness settings
  • Ultra-light, ultra-portable lamp
  • Multiple-setting handle allows flexible usage
  • Tough and sturdy design
  • Able to withstand high temperatures
  • Protection from overcharging
  • Replaceable NiMH battery
  • Hours of Light (after 1 full day of charge): 4 hours with HIGH setting, 8 hours of light with LOW setting
Average Product Lifespan: 
At least three years
Available Support: 
Technical support activities will be discussed on a case-by-case basis with local organisations / distributors.
Maintenance Required: 

Battery will need to be replaced, typically after one to two years.

MontBell logo
MontBell support team

Japan Tsunami Response Phase One

0
Winroader

Japan Tsunami Response Phase Two

5
IVY logo
International Volunteer Center of Yamagata

Japan Tsunami Response Phase Five

4
Secretariat for the support of the hearing impaired in the earthquake affected area
Secretariat for the support of the hearing impaired in the earthquake affected area

Japan Tsunami Response Phase Three

5
Orissa State Volunteers and Social Workers Association logo
Orissa State Volunteers and Social Workers Association

Light Up Orissa, India

4
Fundasaun Esperanza Enclave Oecusse

Light Up Oecusse, Timor-Leste Phase Five

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Wind of Ordos

Light Up Inner Mongolia, China

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Fundasaun Esperanza Enclave Oecusse

Light Up Oecusse, Timor-Leste

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Gelacio I. Yason Foundation Family Farm School logo
Gelacio I. Yason Foundation Family Farm School

Light Up the Philippines

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PEKKA

Start Up Technology Sales in East Flores

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Media coverage:
04 July 2013
Faust Adventurers Guild logo

Internet Donations Alleviate Poverty and Create New Markets

Have you ever heard of a non-profit organization called Kopernik? It’s difficult to sum up the work that Toshi Nakamura, a former member of UN staff closely involved in studying the world's poorest communities, has been taking on since he founded Kopernik. To put it simply, he has been working to connect the poorest communities in the world with simple technologies for the developing world.
Kopernik in action:
26 June 2013
Using a dlight

What d.lights Do: Profile of a Semi-Subsistence Household »

For most of Timor-Leste’s ethnic groups, a woman who marries will take up residence in the village of her new husband. Although this traditional arrangement generally applies to the Vaiqueno (Meto-speakers) of Oecusse, it did not apply to Francisco Ulan. When Francisco married, he migrated from his isolated upland village to the relatively busy lowland village of Suni-Ufe, where his wife, Filomena, had been raised. In settling next door to Filomena’s parents, the new couple broke with tradition for one reason: Suni-Ufe offered economic possibilities that Francisco’s upland village did not.

By Chris Shepherd

Kopernik in action:
26 June 2013
Domingas Tabatan lives with her two youngest children in the remote mountain village of Cabana, in Oecusse, Timor-Leste

What d.lights Do: Profile of a Subsistence Household »

Domingas Tabatan lives with her two youngest children in the village of Cabana, Suni-Ufe Foholeten, Nitibe subdistrict. This is not a coastal roadside village. Although in the first year of Indonesian occupation (1976) the villagers of Cabana were relocated to the coast, where each family was granted a block of land, they were permitted to return to their ancestral lands in 1989, where they have been living ever since. The village consists of a cluster of some 15 grass huts which protrude from the treetops on the hillside like Chinese hats.

By Chris Shepherd

Kopernik in action:
20 June 2013
Man holds d.light

What d.lights Do: Profile of a Near-Subsistence Household »

In my last blog, I drew a distinction between roadside households and non-roadside households. I also suggested that the savings from having to purchase kerosene for lighting enabled households of the poorer economic stratum to purchase rice. In this and forthcoming blogs, I am going to map four classes of households onto that basic distinction: subsistence households, near-subsistence households, semi-subsistence households and non-subsistence households. I will show that d.lights affect these different household economies in different ways.

By Chris Shepherd

Kopernik in action:
08 May 2013
Moon Light Alor

'Allo Alor »

Last December, I wrote about starting a new project in Lakwati village on Alor Island, Indonesia. Working with Topa Haliel Savings and Loans Group, we introduced various solar lights, fuel-efficient cookstoves, and water filters and purifiers to get feedback, find out how much people were willing to pay for them, and work out the most effective ways of getting these technologies into the hands of the people who need them. I am very happy to update you on the progress of this project.

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